Identify the Most Common Symptoms of Heel Spurs

Has heel pain left you unable to work out or perform your routine tasks? There are many causes of heel pain, including heel spurs. 

Heel spurs, which are hardened calcium deposits that form as bony-like growths, can cause pain underneath and in front of your heel.

Don’t ignore heel pain; we can help. At Advanced Foot, Ankle, & Wound Specialists, our team of podiatrists can pinpoint the cause of your heel pain and recommend the appropriate treatments. 

Symptoms of heel spurs

It’s hard to diagnose heel spurs without diagnostic imaging, but you might suspect you have heel spurs if you have the following symptoms.

Heel pain

Heel pain is the most common symptom, and the symptom that probably makes you wonder if you have heel spurs. You might feel pain at the front of your heel, but if the condition progresses, the pain can spread to your arch as well.

Inflammation

In addition to heel pain, you might notice inflammation and swelling at the front of your heel. Cold compresses can help reduce pain and bring down some of the swelling. Try using a cold compress for 15 minutes at a time.

Warmth and redness

Does your heel feel warm, or is it red? It’s common for people with heel spurs to see redness at the front of the heel. The area might feel warm, in which case cold compresses might again bring relief.

Visible bony protrusion 

The bony calcium deposits that cause the pain aren’t always visible to the naked eye. But they can grow up to half an inch, and as they grow, you might eventually see the bony protrusion.

Treating heel spurs

If diagnostic imaging, such as an X-ray, confirms you have heel spurs, our team at Advanced Foot, Ankle, & Wound Specialists can help you get back on your feet. We treat heel spurs with conservative and surgical treatments.

Conservative treatments include:

Sometimes, despite your best efforts, conservative treatments just aren’t enough to give you the relief you need, but you’re not out of options. We also provide corticosteroid shots and surgery, if needed. Corticosteroid injections won’t cure heel spurs, but they do reduce pain and inflammation. 

The risk of developing heel spurs is higher if you:

That's why it’s important to reduce the risk factors that are within your control. Wear shoes that fit correctly, and if you have plantar fasciitis or gait issues, seek podiatric care for any and all foot issues — not just heel spurs.

When heel spurs aren’t the cause of your pain

Even though heel spurs cause pain, not everyone who has heel spurs experiences pain, at least not right away. Other causes of heel pain are impact injuries, Morton’s neuroma, or other foot conditions.

If your foot hurts, don’t hesitate to reach out to us. To request an appointment, contact us at one of our offices in Tamarac, Fort Lauderdale, Boca Raton, Coral Springs, or Hollywood, Florida.

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